Integrating the Arts

posted in: Arts, Assessment, Reform | 0

In a recent post on the EdWeek blog, Matthew Lynch talks about the loss of the arts as subjects, and the use of the arts as integrated into other subjects. Before getting too enthusiastic about this approach, it is important to remember that integration of the arts requires common planning, implementing, and assessment. When the arts are placed in the classroom as full partners, student learning increases.

The arts have always had a secondary place in K-12 learning. If you doubt that statement, think of the first programs to go whenever budget cuts are implemented – music, fine arts and even physical fitness which includes dance. I’ve yet to hear of a school board or administrators discussing the way cutting math programs could help the school’s bottom line. There is a hierarchy of academics in America, and arts education tends to fall pretty low on the totem pole.

That’s why some districts are implementing arts integration in their curriculum. Instead of treating the arts like a separate, distant relative to other classroom endeavors, these programs integrate musical instruments, painting, dancing, drawing, singing and more into traditional subjects like science, math and language. When implemented correctly, these programs are enthusiastically received by students who learn comprehensively (EdWeek blog).

So what does that mean for classrooms that are struggling with new curriculums? Think about integrating the arts by finding a teaching artist to partner with you. Find a way to plan your most ambitious curriculum ideas by engaging students in the arts and allow their learning in and through the arts to support your highest expectations for their achievement. Let me leave you with an enticing thought: there is beginning research to show that students who are most at risk in our classrooms benefit most from arts integration.