Venice Comes to the Center For Creative Education

posted in: Arts, Reform, Uncategorized | 0

Introduction The Center for Creative Education in Palm Beach County provides arts integration programs to K-2 students. The Center structures its school support by pairing teaching artists who partner with regular classroom teachers to deliver the creative arts integration. The … Continued

Teaching and Learning; Performance Assessment Drives Better Thinking

Factory-Model Schooling One of the ways in which we think about teaching and learning is to ask what do we want our students to learn. Although this is a great question, the answers that teachers and schools choose often lead … Continued

Dream, Possibilities and Necessity of Public Education—AERA 2018

posted in: Assessment, Reform | 0

New York City welcomes the American Education Research Association back for its annual conference, “Dreams, Possibilities and Necessity of Public Education” Thousands of researchers from around the country are gathering to listen, review, feedback and pushback on the latest research … Continued

Congressional Briefing on Performance Assessment: An Opportunity to Advance Educational Equity and Transform Teaching and Learning

posted in: Assessment, Reform | 2

I have been invited to this congressional briefing this Thursday and want to share the details with you! Congressional Briefing Remarks by Senator Maggie Hassan (D-NH) Thursday, April 12, 2018 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (ET) 216 Hart Senate Building, Washington, … Continued

The Honesty Gap; The Illusion of Measuring Proficiency

posted in: Reform | 0

One of the great gifts of standardized testing was the premise of giving the same questions to many students would allow for a more reliable measure of student achievement. This reliability is gained through standardization of the test, while validity is gained by the relevance of the questions to the stated purpose of the test. In the 1920s, college admission officers leaped on this bandwagon in order to compare students from New Hampshire and Ohio, and thus was born our accountability system tied to test scores.

However, there are some problems with this logic. What if the students had not been prepared in the same way? What if there were cultural reasons why answers might differ across state lines? What if smart teachers or test-coaching companies could study the test and provide useful insight? And what if test companies manipulated the pass/fail line, commonly called the cut score, for political reasons? In a recent article in Education Next, Michael J. Petrilli discusses the illusion of proficiency and the resulting gap in honesty:

New Assessment System: Evidence of Teacher and Student Learning (ETSL)

posted in: Arts, Assessment, Reform | 0

Pioneering Performance Assessments

The SchoolWorks Lab, Inc. recommends from previous evaluations (Southworth 2008) that there is a need for a performance assessment system to more accurately and equitably measure the learning outcomes described in the ETSL Templates. There is a vacuum associated with the accurate measurement of complex student performance in education. The arts have a long history of pioneering and were one of the first subject areas to adopt the pursuit of national standards (Consortium of National Arts Education Associations 1994). Researchers (Moss 1996) have argued that assessment is trapped in the psychometric side of understanding, in the standardization of the process across individuals, classrooms, districts and that the creative use of performance assessment might lead to more accurate measurement of student achievement.